Baring all for endangered animals

endagered animals
Posing as a vulture

Staff members from Jenman African Safaris have shed their clothes in order to shed some light on raising awareness for Africa’s endangered species.

Jenman African Safaris is a family-run safari operator who came up with a conservation campaign: a calendar that features semi-nude – yet tasteful – photographs. Each month features a photo of staff member dressed up as an endangered, wild animal of Africa. Staying true to the conservation theme, they replaced their clothing with body paint and were styled to look like wild animals. The body paint creations were done by students from The Make-up Issue, and photographed on a smallholding near Philadelphia in the Western Cape.

As one of Africa’s largest and most established safari operators, the company feels a sense of responsibility to help raise awareness for Africa’s growing endangered species list.

Staff members were invited to be part of the project and participants had to choose which endangered wild animal they wished to represent as part of this awareness drive. “My colleagues jumped at the opportunity to help with such a worthy cause. Even some of our clients who heard about it were interested and offered their support,” said Katja Quasdorf, Marketing Director of Jenman African Safaris. But it was the director, Garth Jenman, who was the driving force after he wholeheartedly agreed and signed off the idea.

Many endangered species do not receive the media attention required to help combat their endangered status and this was exactly the point of this project.

We are proud to share the final outcome of this incredible initiative.

Black Rhino

Vincent wanted to do help save the rhinos and is fighting to combat the poaching of these beautiful creatures.

endangered animals
Posing as a Black Rhino

European hunters are responsible for the early decline of black rhino populations. It was not uncommon for five or six rhinos to be killed in a day for food or simply for amusement. In the 20th century, European settlers arrived in Africa to establish farms and plantations and continued this senseless slaughter. Most people regarded rhinos as vermin and enjoyed hunting them.

endangered animals
Black Rhino

DOOMED. That was the front page headline of the UK newspaper, the Daily Mirror, in 1961, over a full-page photo of two African rhinos. The article said that rhinos were “doomed to disappear from the face of the earth due to man’s folly, greed, and neglect” and encouraged readers to support conservation efforts.

Cheetah

Katja is elegant and enjoys staying in the fast lane. Need we say more?

endangered animals
Posing as a cheetah

No one can deny the grace and beauty of the fastest land animal on earth. The cheetah can run up to 120 km per hour and can accelerate from 0 to 96 km/h (0 to 60 mph) in three seconds. These beauties have been the subject of countless incredible wildlife images with their dark tear stains and perfectly spotted, agile bodies.

endangered animals
Cheetah

Unfortunately, many farmers don’t love that cheetahs are smart enough to know that a sheep is easier prey than an antelope on the run. Many farmers end up poisoning, shooting or trapping the cheetah culprits. Major threats are the conflict of farmers and predators and loss of habitat. Today, the cheetah is endangered mainly because humans have taken over the cat’s habitat and killed the small antelopes they hunt.

The Cape Mountain Zebra

Celia loves miniature animals and design. She chose to support the Cape Mountain Zebra because it is the smallest of all zebras, but also because she loves its geometrical stripes that are completely different to those of any other zebra species.

endangered animals
The Cape Mountain Zebra

This species is the rarest, smallest and most beautiful of the zebras – and only 1.2 m tall.
Listed as vulnerable on the IUCN Red List, the Cape mountain zebra was hunted to near extinction. But thanks to conservation efforts, the population has increased to over 2,700.

endangered animals
Posing as a Cape Mountain Zebra

There is a European Zoos Endangered Species Program for this zebra, as well as co-operative management of zoo populations worldwide.

Chameleons

Rochelle is an artist by nature and loves wearing bright clothing to express her authenticity. She chose to represent the lesser chameleon (Furcifer minor) that best represents her creative side.

endangered animals
Lesser Chameleon

Unlike most chameleons, it is the female lesser chameleon that is the more colourful sex. These colourful chameleons are only found in Madagascar and are listed as endangered. It is threatened by habitat loss as a result of mining and logging.

endangered animals
Posing as a Chameleon

There are about 160 species of chameleons. Chameleons can be 1 inch to 1 foot (30.48 cm) long and their tongues are about 1 ½ their body length. Their long tongues have a sticky tip to catch insects. Chameleons can rotate each eye in a different direction.

Lemur

When Ruth who works at Jenman’s received a list of endangered species to choose from, she couldn’t resist nominating her son to be part of this project as he reminds her of a little lemur that enjoys climbing trees. Xola has had a treehouse since he was three. When he wants to spend time alone, he still escapes to his special treehouse.

endangered animals
Blue eyed lemur

Humans have cut down almost all of this species’ habitat to clear farm land. As a result, the blue-eyed black lemur is nearly extinct in the wild and critically endangered. As few as 1,000 individuals are thought to remain in the wild due to slash-and-burn habitat destruction and hunting. Consequently, this species has been named one of “The World’s 25 Most Endangered Primates”.

endangered animals
Posing as a lemur

Lemurs rely on their sense of smell as a way of communicating with other animals. They have special scent glands on their wrists and bottoms that leave scent trails on branches to mark their territories. A lemur’s soft, broad fingers and toes have flat nails that allow it to grip objects and groom other lemurs.

Vultures

Free as a bird… that is Liz. And her everlasting passion for bird-watching was the reason for this beautiful match. We easily underestimate the importance of vultures perhaps because the animals have quite a negative connotation. But the essence of being a vulture is to clean up, and therefore, do good.

endangered animals
Vulture

By eating carcasses, they avoid diseases from spreading in the animal kingdom. Cape vultures are only found in southern Africa – a sign of their already limited population. The major threats they are currently facing include the loss of habitat, electrocution on pylons, collision with cables and unintentional poisoning.

endangered animals
Posing as a vulture

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